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What are Big and Hyper Data?

 
     
 
         
     

From big data to hyperdata

Big data tracks individuals and predicts desires. It comes from the past, refers to the future, and operates in the present.

 
         
      Hyper data creates desires and shapes individuals. It comes from the present, refers to the past, and operates in the future, always just over the horizon of the present.  
         
     

Consumption and ecstasy

 
     

Ecstasy is vaulting outside oneself, it's a particular rapture that disassociates us from who we normally are.

  • The phrase Your out of your mind intersects with the idea of ecstasy.

 

The ecstasy of consumption is the marketing of opportunities for transformative experiences: products and services that potentially cut individuals away from who they have been, and set them off in a different direction, maybe temporarily, maybe permanently. Examples:

  • psilocybin
  • Liberal Arts college education
  • Massage
  • Adventure travel
  • Tinder
 
         
     

Consumption and excess

 
     

There are two kinds of need. One that results from having too little, and the other from having too much.

 

Excess is the state of need corresponding with the imperfection of overflow: we need more because we've already had too much.

 

Examples of need as lack, as less than perfect:

  • Food
  • Drink
  • Sleep

 

Example of need as excess, as more than perfect:

  • Cigarettes

It has never happened that a nonsmoker suddenly felt the craving for nicotine. You only want a cigarette because you've already smoked one, and so triggered a craving that would'nt have existed otherwise. And, in accordance with the economics of excess, the more you smoke, the more you need.

 

You only need a cigarette because you've already had too many.

 
         
     

Consumption and hyperdata

 
      Hyperdata folds naturally into the marketplace segment defined by the overlap of ecstasy and excess.  
         
   
         
 
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